EDUC 4315 – Course Outline


Course Outline (PDF)


 COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

  • The Curriculum Methods course consists of three separate components – teaching and learning, management, and instructional technology. The methods component taught by Glenda Black and Roger Bernardes consists of fundamental strategies & approaches to enhance teaching and learning in intermediate-senior courses that go beyond and may also include your teachable subjects. The classroom management component, taught by Ken Waller, identifies strategies appropriate to the developmental needs of intermediate and senior level learners and their particular situations. The instructional technology component, also taught by Ken Waller, introduces the roles of information technology in teaching and learning.
  • In the teaching & learning component of methods, a variety of formats are used to critically explore topics including stories/narratives, drama, research, multimedia, cooperative learning, metacognitive techniques, debate/discussion, and case studies. Because topics are interrelated, they may be interspersed throughout the year rather than being presented in an entirely consecutive manner. The program components are connected to the practice teaching component of our education program (EDUC 4355). Relevant readings and in-class activities form part of the requirements for this course. Teaching issues will be addressed as they arise from various sources such as practice teaching experience, media, the Ontario Ministry of Education, and the Ontario College of Teachers initiatives. Punctual attendance, constructive participation in class activities, assignments handed in on due dates and, especially, initiative in the practice of teaching and learning methods during placements, are expected of all teacher candidates.
CLASS MEETING TIMES—CHECK SCHEDULE WEEKLY FOR CHANGES. Unless otherwise notified, all classes are held in H-110
I/S Section 1 I/S Section 2 I/S Section 3

Weeks 1-12

Mon. 9:30-11:30 a.m. & Fri. 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Weeks 13-18

Mon. 9:30-10:30 a.m.

Weeks 1-13

Thurs. 8:30-10:30 a.m. & Fri. 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Weeks 13-18

Fri. 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Weeks 1-13

Wed. 10:30-12:30 a.m. & Fri. 9:30-10:30 a.m.

Weeks 13-18

Wed. 10:30-11:30 a.m.

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (from Program Learning Outcomes):By the end of this course, successful teacher candidates will: 

  1. Demonstrates understanding of diverse and inclusive learning environments for intermediate and senior learners
  2. Acquires an understanding of subject-specific and general teaching methodologies, strategies, and techniques
  3. Constructs appropriate learning plans (e.g., lesson plans, longer-range plans, individual education plans) within the context of assessment of learners’ needs, the learning environment, provincial expectations, etc.
  4. Demonstrates an ability to communicate accurately and reliably in various written and oral forms (e.g., multimedia, interviews, reports)
  5. Exhibit critical reflection of effective teaching and learning strategies
  6. Practices in compliance with the Ethical Standards and Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession of the Ontario College of Teachers, and the Education Act.
  7. Differentiate teaching and learning strategies to encompass professional awareness of content, process, product and environment

TEACHER CANDIDATE OUTPUTS: By the end of this course, teacher candidates will:

  1. Successfully observe, record, and organize information gathered during the first week of practicum
  2. Accurately create a lesson plan using the Schulich School of Education Lesson Planning Format that includes all the required elements of the guidelines and checklists
  3. Professionally analyze and respond to in-class case studies
  4. Develop a Professional Portfolio that reflects the Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession stated by the Ontario College of Teachers 

EVALUATION: Teacher candidates should note that the final standing in EDUC 4315 is a composite grade based on: 

PART I:                 TEACHING & LEARNING                                                   (75%)
PART II:                MANAGEMENT                                                                   (15%)
PART III:               INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY                                      (10%) = Total 100

EDUC 4315 PART I:  TEACHING & LEARNING METHODS (75%)

ASSESSMENT and EVALUATION: Marks Due Dates
1. Observation (Individual) 5% 2nd  Methods class, week of Sept. 8—12, 2014
2. Lesson Plan (Individual) 15% 2nd Methods class, week of Sept. 15–19, 2014
3. Case Studies (Midterm Exam) (Individual) 25% 1st Methods class, week of Jan. 26–Jan. 30, 2015
4. Professional Portfolio (Individual) 30% Thursday April 9, 2015

COURSE EVALUATION AND FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

  • This course outline contains all pertinent information with regard to expectations for and requirements of this course.
  • Assignments [see above] in the Teaching & Learning components of EDUC 4315 Part I, and the requirements for Part II and Part III components, are to be successfully completed with a final mark of 60% or more to meet course requirements.
  • There is a form to be completed and any late acceptance is ultimately at the professor’s discretion (forms are provided upon request from professor)
  • Assignments have identified due dates. Late penalties of 5% per instructional day may apply; beyond 3 days, assignments may not be accepted, nor may they be accepted if the professor has already handed back marked assignments.
  • Assignments must identify the assignment topic/title, course name and number, section number, due date, professor’s and teacher candidate’s name, and must be directly submitted to the Methods professor. Use APA, 6th edition for formatting where appropriate.
  • Teacher candidates are responsible for keeping back-up copies of all written work and assignments for this class.
  • Teacher candidates are expected to arrive for class on time, be prepared (i.e., required readings completed before class), and to conduct themselves professionally in keeping with the Foundations of Professional Practice as found on the Ontario College of Teachers website. This means that activities such as talking out of turn, completing work for other courses, listening to iPods, checking cell phone messages, web-surfing, and using computer applications such as email and Facebook are inappropriate in-class activities and are a distraction to you, your classmates, and the instructor.
  • Teacher candidates must use their Nipissing e-mail address when emailing the course instructor. All email communication should be professional in tone and content, and in keeping with the Foundations of Professional Practice as found on the website for the Ontario College of Teachers.
  • If a teacher candidate is absent for a scheduled test or in-class assignment, it is the candidate’s responsibility to contact the instructor as soon as possible. The teacher candidate must provide appropriate documentation for the absence before a request to make up missed work will be considered.
  • When engaged in group work, each teacher candidate must be familiar with the cooperative learning model of positive interdependence, individual accountability, equal participation, and simultaneous interaction.

UNIVERSITY POLICY AND PROCEDURES

Academic Dishonesty
The University takes a very serious view of such offences against academic honesty as plagiarism, cheating, and impersonation. Penalties for dealing with such offences will be strictly enforced. The complete policy on Academic Dishonesty is in the Policies section of the Calendar. Please refer to the Nipissing University policy on Academic Dishonesty in the Course Calendar http://www.nipissingu.ca/calendar/regulations/academic/Pages/Student-Appeals-and-Petitions.aspx#dishonesty
For appeals unrelated to academic dishonesty, please refer to the Student Appeals Committee guidelines – http://www.nipissingu.ca/calendar/regulations/academic/Pages/Student-Appeals-and-Petitions.aspx#appeals

Students requiring accommodation or other support services should contact the Office of Student Development and Services (ext. 4362 or sas@nipissingu.ca). Students are encouraged to initiate a conversation with the instructor about course-specific accommodations. (http://www.nipissingu.ca/departments/student-development-and-services/Pages/default.aspx)

Attendance
The attendance policy is found at: http://www.nipissingu.ca/calendar/regulations/academic/Pages/Attendance.aspx
In brief, punctual and regular attendance is essential for the successful completion of a course. When absenteeism exceeds 20%, the student may be excluded from writing the final examination. In addition, the following regulations apply to students enrolled in the consecutive education program:
Students who do not demonstrate regular attendance may be required to withdraw from the Bachelor of Education program unless medical documentation or other authorized documentation, deemed appropriate by the Faculty, is received. This policy may be implemented if a student is absent more than the number of hours indicated (approximately 20% of the total hours).
Grading

The grading policy is found at the following link:
http://www.nipissingu.ca/calendar/regulations/academic/Pages/Evaluation-and-Grading-System.aspx

Grades and the Basis for Assessment:
“A” indicates Exceptional Performance (80-100%): comprehensive in-depth knowledge of the principles and materials treated in the course, fluency in communicating that knowledge and independence in applying material and principles.
“B” indicates Good Performance (70-79%): thorough understanding of the breadth of materials and principles treated in the course and ability to apply and communicate that understanding effectively.
“C” indicates Satisfactory Performance (60-69%): basic understanding of the breadth of principles and materials treated in the course and an ability to apply and communicate that understanding competently.
“D” indicates Minimally Competent Performance (50-59%): adequate understanding of most principles and materials treated in the course, but significant weakness in some areas and in the ability to apply and communicate that understanding.
“F” indicates Failure (0-49%): inadequate or fragmentary knowledge of the principles and materials treated in the course or failure to complete the work required in the course.

REQUIRED RESOURCES FOR TEACHING & LEARNING METHODS PART I

ONTARIO MINISTRY OF EDUCATON ELECTRONIC RESOURCES

CURRICULUM LINKS

POLICIES RELATED TO CURRICULUM

RECOMMENDED TEXTS AVAILABLE IN THE LIBRARY 

  • Cooper, D. (2010). Talk about assessment: High school strategies and tools. Toronto, ON. Nelson Education.
  • Eby, J., Herrell, A., & Hicks, J. (2002). Reflective Planning, Teaching, and Evaluation, K-12. Columbus, OH: Merrill Prentice Hall.
  • Hoerr, T. (2010). Celebrating every learner: Activities and strategies for creating a multiple intelligences classroom. New York, NY: Jossey-Bass.
  • Hume, Karen. (2012). What’s your problem?” Teachers’ Handbook. Don Mills, ON: Pearson.
  • Langford, H., & Barnett, J. (Eds.). (2006). Education methods: A case study approach to professional development. Toronto, ON: John Wiley & Sons Canada, Ltd.
  • Lemlech, J. K. (2006). Curriculum and instructional for the elementary and middle school. Upper Saddler River, NJ: Pearson/Merrill/Prentice Hall.
  • Laud, L. (2011). Differentiated instruction in literacy, math, & science. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
  • Schwartz, S., & Pollishuke, M. (2005). Creating the Dynamic Classroom: A Handbook for Teachers. Toronto, ON: Pearson Education Canada Inc.
  • Tomlinson, C.A. (2008). The differentiated school: Making revolutionary changes in teaching and learning (electronic book). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
  • Tomlinson, C. A. (2014). Assessment and student success in a differentiated classroom (electronic book). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
  • Tomlinson, C. A., & Strickland, C. A. (2006). Differentiation in practice: a resource guide for differentiating curriculum, grades 9-12. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
COURSE THEMES AND SPECIFIC OUTPUTS

 

Block I theme: Planning Basics
Specific Outputs:

  • Develop understanding of developmental characteristics of students
  • Develop an understanding of lesson planning components (hook, anecdotal notes, etc.) and Backward Design
  • Apply understanding of assessment and evaluation strategies
  • Create lesson plan in specific subject area
  • Develop an awareness of differentiated instruction (con’t in Block III)
Block II theme: Questioning & Communication
Specific Outputs:

  • Identify, analyze, and apply metacognition to the teaching and learning process
  • Identify and apply cooperative learning strategies to teaching and learning
  • Identify and apply questioning skills
  • Apply Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy to lesson and curriculum planning
  • Examine and apply understanding of learning styles, specifically multiple intelligences
Block III theme: Differentiation
Specific Outputs:

  • Apply the components of differentiated instruction: a) content, b) product, c) process, d) environment
  • Examine applicable Ministry documents related to differentiated instruction for intermediate/senior students
  • Examine students at risk and the Pygmalion Theory and Teacher Expectations
  • Analyze and respond to a Case Study

 

 

 

 

Block IV theme: Metacognition and Differentiation
Specific Outputs:

  • Examine and apply metacognitive human learning strategies, including visual representation, summarizing, and elaborative interrogation
  • Examine the basic principles in communicating with colleagues, parents/guardians
  • Develop an understanding of how to create an inclusive educational environment for males and/or Aboriginal students
  • Explore and apply a range of teaching strategies including concept maps or visual organizers
  • Engage in debate to enhance learning
  • Analyze case studies on application of method
Block V theme: Moving towards the future
Specific Outputs:

  • Examine diversity (gender, race, class, sexuality, ELL, etc.) as it applies holistically to intermediate-senior students
  • Explore drama techniques to enhance learning
  • Develop understanding of hiring process (resume, cover letter, interview process, mock interviews)

BLOCK I – PLANNING BASICS

DATE OBJECTIVES & ACTIVITES

RESOURCES, READINGS, & ASSIGNMENTS

( HW = Homework    RR = Recommended Reading )

Week 1,
Aug. 25-29
(3 hours)
(A) INTRODUCTION
– Review course outline & website(B) OBSERVATION(C) DEVELOPMENTAL CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS
Bookmark: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/
and
http://www.nipissingu.ca/faculty/glendab/index.htmBookmark: Schluch School of Education, Nipissing University. (2013-2013). Practice Teaching Handbook. North Bay, ON: Schulich School of Education from http://www.nipissingu.ca/academics/faculties/schulich-school-of-education/bed-programs/bed-consecutive/practice-teaching/Pages/Practice-Teaching-Handbook.aspxHW: review lesson plan examples from my website, ‘Resources—Lesson Planning’: http://www.nipissingu.ca/faculty/glendab/index.htmHW: Complete Observation Assignment to be handed in week 2, 2nd class http://faculty.nipissingu.ca/glendab/EDUC4315/assignments.htm
Week 2,
Sept. 8-12
(3 hours)

(A) Review observation assignment in whole group

(B) LESSON PLANNING
– Expectations
– Backward Design
– Three Part Lesson

(C) More on expectations

Ontario Ministry Of Education Curriculum Documents: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/teachers/curriculum.html

RR: Schwartz, S., & Pollishuke, M. (2005, p. 62). “Hook.” Creating the Dynamic Classroom, A Handbook for Teachers. Toronto: Pearson Education Canada Inc.

* Observation Assignment due 2nd Methods class (5%)

HW: Complete Lesson Plan Assignment to be handed in week 3, second class https://faculty.nipissingu.ca/glendab/EDUC4315/assignments.htm

Week 3,
Sept. 15-19
(3 hours)

(A) LESSON PLANNING

– Overview of assessment and evaluation in the context the lesson plan.
– Introduction of For, As Of learning for lesson plan

RR: Ontario Ministry of Education (2010). Growing Success: Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting in Ontario Schools: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/policyfunding/success.html

*Lesson Plan due 2nd Methods class (15%)

 

 

 

Week 4,
Sept. 22-26
(3 hours)

(A) RETURN & DISCUSS LESSON PLANS

(B) PORTFOLIO Synopsis

(C) DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION
Introduction to DI components

(D) PRACTICUM PREPARATION

  • P T Handbook

Nipissing University. (2013-2014). Practice Teaching Handbook. North Bay, ON: Schulich School of Education.

RR: EDUGAINS- Differentiated Instruction (Ministry of Education): http://www.edugains.ca/newsite/di2/

*Portfolio assignment due April 9, 2014: https://faculty.nipissingu.ca/glendab/EDUC4315/assignments.htm

 

BLOCK II – QUESTIONING & COMMUNICATION

Week 5,
Oct. 20-24
(3 hours)
(A) WELCOME BACK
– Debrief practicum
– Review lesson plans(B) MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES
– Multiple Intelligences To Enhance Learning (Instruction and Assessment)
– Who is intelligent? (PowerPoint)
– Create a choice board

RR: “Appendix 1: Beginning Teacher’s Checklist” & Chapter 12, “Partnerships with Parents” (pp. 189-208) in Creating the Dynamic Classroom, A Handbook for Teachers

Multiple Intelligences: Links to sample Inventories
http://www.literacyworks.org/mi/assessment/findyourstrengths.html
http://surfaquarium.com/MI/inventory.htm
http://www.bgfl.org/custom/resources_ftp/client_ftp/ks3/ict/multiple_int/

HW: Finish choice board on MI for portfolio

Week 6,
Oct. 27-Oct. 31
(3 hours)
(A)   CO-OPERATIVE LEARNING
– Characteristics of cooperative learning(B) QUESTIONING
– Educative, double-barrelled
– Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy

RR: “Cooperative Learning”: http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/DE/PD/instr/strats/coop/

Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy: http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/bloom.html

Week 7,
Nov. 3-7
(3 hours)
DIFFERENTIATION
– Content, process, product, environment
– Ministry documents for IS students

RR: Tomlinson, C. A., & Strickland, C. A. (2006). Differentiation in practice: a resource guide for differentiating curriculum, grades 9-12. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

RR: EDUGAINS: http://www.edugains.ca/newsite/di2/

RR: Differentiation Central: http://differentiationcentral.com/resources.html

HW: Add evidence of understanding current views on differentiation from the Ministry and educational research to your portfolio

BLOCK III –DIFFERENTIATION

Week 8,
Dec. 1-5
(3 hours)

(A) PRACTICUM DEBRIEFING

(B) PYGMALION THEORY
– Pygmalion theory / self-fulfilling prophesies /teacher expectations—the ethos, environment, or climate component of differentiation

RR: Tauber, R. (2009). What teachers expect from students, they generally get! Education Matters: a publication of the Association of American Educators Foundation, 2, 1-3 from: http://www.aaeteachers.org/newsletters/aprilnews09.pdf

RR: The “Teddy Stallard Story” from the Make a Difference Movie from http://www.makeadifferencemovie.com/

HW: add evidence of understanding students at risk & the Pygmalion Theory to Portfolio

Week 9,
Dec. 8-12
(3 hours)
(A)     STUDENTS AT RISK
– Ministry documents for I/S students
RR: Ontario Students at Risk: http://www.oasar.org/

BLOCK IV: METACOGNITION AND DIFFERENTIATION

Week 10,
Jan. 5-9
(3 hours)

 (A) Aboriginal students—Inclusive educational environment for elementary and secondary student

(B) VISUAL ORGANIZERS TO ENHANCE LEARNING

– Smart Ideas

RR: Ministry of Education. Aboriginal Education Strategy. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/aboriginal/

Heyerle, D. (1999). Thinking Maps. Retrieved from http://www.thinkingmaps.com/htthinkmapx.php3

HW: Add notes and examples of visual organizers to portfolio

Week 11,
Jan. 12-16
(3 hours)
(A) METACOGNITION TO ENHANCE LEARNING
– Learning strategies: Representational Imagery; Elaborative interrogation; Acronyms; Keyword Method; Summarizing; Concept mapping; Teacher behaviour; Student behaviour (Jigsaw)

  • These are also literacy strategies

(B) COMMUNICATION WITH COLLEGUES, PARENTS/GUARDIANS, AND STUDENTS
– Construct newsletter

(C) CASE STUDY review

RR: Seifert, T. (Fall 1993). Learning Strategies In The Classroom. Retrieved July 7, 2006, from http://www.mun.ca/educ/faculty/mwatch/vol2/seifert.html

Sample newsletters under Resources-Student Work on website:

http://www.nipissingu.ca/faculty/glendab/index.htm

 HW: Add synthesis notes on human learning strategies to portfolio

HW: Add newsletter to Portfolio

Week 12
Jan. 19-23
(3 hours)
(A) COOPERATIVE DISCIPLINE

RR: Fraser, S. & De Gannes, C. (2008). Cooperative Discipline Overview Site. Retrieved August 11, 2009, from: http://cdiscipline.tripod.com/

HW: Create a Behaviour Contract for Portfolio

Week 13
Jan. 26-30
(2 hours)
(A)   CASE STUDY * Case studies in 1st class (25%)
Week 14,
Feb. 2-6
(2 hours)
(A)  DEBATE TO ENHANCE LEARNING
– The line 4 Corners Debate(B) LESSON PLANNING
– Daybook Lesson Planning

(D) PORTFOLIO
– Review elements for Portfolio assignment

RR: Schluch School of Education, Nipissing University. (2013-2014). Practice Teaching Handbook. North Bay, ON, Daybook Lesson Planning.

HW: Create a debate for one of your classes for your portfolio

BLOCK V: MOVING TOWARDS THE FUTURE

Week 15,
March 30- April 2
(2 hours)

(A)   DISCUSS PRACTICUM

(B) I/S DIVERSITY

LGBTTIQ, ethnic & linguistic minorities, ELL, etc.

RR: Miller, J. (Ed.). (2005). Holistic learning and spirituality in education: breaking new ground. Albany: State University of New York Press. www.garfield.library.upenn.edu/classics1980/A1980JD87300001.pdf

RR: Spence, C. M. (2006). Creating a literacy environment for boys: ideas for administrators, teachers, and parents. Toronto, ON: Thomson Nelson.

Week 16,
April 6-10
(2 hours)

 (A) DISCUSS ENTRY PLAN

(B) DRAMA TECHNIQUES TO ENHANCE LEARNING
– Role play
– Improvisation
– Miming
– Tableau

Ontario Council of Dance and Drama Educators from http://code.on.ca/

*Portfolio due Wednesday April 9, 2015 (25%)

Week 17,
April 13-17
(2 hours)
(A) PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE – INTERVIEWS
– Resume or Curriculum Vitae, cover letters
– Sample questions

Resumes and Cover Letters. DiversityCanada.com’s Employers Want You, pp. 12-15 from http://diversitycanada.org/handbook.pdf

HW: prepare for job interview role-play

Week 18,
April 20-24
(2 hours)
ROLE PLAY OF JOB INTERVIEWS IN SMALL GROUPS Portfolios handed back during final exams in the I/S Division

 

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