GEND 2217 Syllabus

Gender and the Media: Themes and Controversies

Fall 2015 | FIND WEBNOTES HERE
Tuesdays 12:30-3:20

This course examines the media’s role in the representation of gender through a close examination of various themes and issues. Students will be encouraged to develop critical reading and analytic skills, and to apply them to analyze a range of different media. This course may be credited towards English Studies (Group 2) and a Major in Fine Arts (Art History and Visual Studies stream). In 2015 we will focus on gender, race and sexualities.

Instructor: Dr. Wendy Peters
Office: A310 (above the small cafeteria)
Phone: 474-3450 ext. 4889
Email: wendyp@nipissingu.ca
Fall 2015 office hours: Tuesdays 11:30-12:20 – or by appointment

Required text is available at the Nipissing University Bookstore: Dines, G. & Humez, J.M. (2015). Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. Please note that we are using the fourth edition. There is a copy of the reader on 3-hour short term loan in the library.

Weekly readings are required and should be completed before class. All materials including images, television series and film screenings are considered testable material.

Marking scheme

Attendance & participation 15%
Take-home midterm 25% Due: October 20 2015
Research essay 30% Due: January 12 2016 by 12:30 pm
Take home 30% Due: January 12 2016 by 12:30 pm

Changes to syllabus as discussed in class:

1. Research essay worth 30% is now due by January 12, 2016 at 12:30 pm. I will begin marking essays on January 5, 2016. The sooner you submit your paper the sooner it will be returned to you. If you submit your essay (in person or via email) by January 6 at 12:30 pm, I will mark it and provide feedback before January 12, 2016. If you submit between January 6 and 8 I will do my best to return this to you prior to January 12. This early submission option will give you a sense of your grade going into the final assignment.

2. Take Home 30% Due: January 12, 2016 by 12:30 pm

3. Assignments will be accepted by email.

4. Jade Boyd’s article will be dropped from the syllabus.

Late penalties will be applied in this class. No assignment will be accepted after the due date without prior permission from the instructor. Extensions will be considered only in advance of the deadline and under exceptional circumstances. All assignments must be submitted at the beginning of class or they will be considered late. Any assignments submitted after the beginning of class will be penalized 10% per day, for up to 5 days, after which time late assignments will not be accepted or graded. Assignments will not be accepted by email.

All term work must be submitted by January 15, 2016 except with written permission of the Dean of Arts and Science.

AccessAbility
Students with a range of learning styles and needs are welcome in this course. In particular, if you have a disability / health consideration that may require accommodations, please contact the Disability Services Office as soon as possible. The Disability Services staff are available by appointment to assess specific needs, provide referrals and arrange appropriate accommodations. The sooner you let us know your needs the quicker we can assist you in achieving your learning goals in this course.

Laptops
Students are permitted to use laptop computers only for taking notes from the lectures. Playing games, surfing the internet, checking e-mail, instant messaging, watching videos or listening to music are not permitted during class time. If you are disrupting other students with this kind of laptop activity, you will be asked to turn off your laptop.

September 8 2015
Welcome and Introduction

September 15 2015
Cultural Studies and Social Justice

Dines, G. & Humez, J.M. (2015). Preface. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. x-xiii). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Kellner, D. (2015). Cultural Studies, Multiculturalism, and Media Culture. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 7-19). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Lull, J. (1995 / 2015). Hegemony. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 39-42). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. *Fear not! Get through this difficult reading and we will discuss it in class. If you don’t already get it, you will understand this reading by the end of GEND 2217.

Please note the “Glossary of Terms” on pages 696-710.

key concepts: social justice; cultural studies; political economy; textual analysis; audience reception; hegemony

September 22 2015
Political Economy of Media

Croteau, D.P., Hoynes, W.D. & Milan, S. (2011 / 2015). The Economics of the Media Industry. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 28-38). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Foster, J.B. & McChesney (2011 / 2015). The Internet’s Unholy Marriage to Capitalism. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 43-50). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Jhally, S. (1990 / 2015). Image-Based Culture: Advertising and Popular Culture. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 246-250). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

key concepts: political economy; conglomeration; vertical and horizontal integration; synergy; network effects; selling emotions; “a discourse through and about objects”

September 29 2015
Television Without Pity: Active Audiences and Online Labour

Kohnen, M.E.S. (2008). The Adventures of a Repressed Farm Boy and the Billionaire Who Loves Him: Queer Spectatorship in Smallville Fandom. In S.M. Ross & L.E. Stein (Eds.), Teen Television: Essays in Programming and Fandom (pp. 207-223). Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company. Click here for pdf: The Adventures of a Repressed Farm Boy and the Billionaire.rotated If this article interests you, consider GEND 3046: Queer Media. The conceptions of “queer” used in GEND 3046 parallel those used in this reading.

Andrejevic, M. (2007 / 2015). Watching Television Without Pity: The Productivity of Online Fans. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 78-86). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

key concepts: “seeing queerly”; fandom; slash; “active” viewers; digital labour that is “voluntarily given and exploited” (78); online activity—when is it activism?

October 6 2015
Dominance, Resistance and Incorporation

Butsch, R. (2001 / 2015). Reconsidering Resistance and Incorporation. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 87-98). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Balance, C.B. (2012 / 2015). How It Feels to Be Viral Me: Affective Labor and Asian American YouTube Performance. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 668-677). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

key concepts: subcultures; dominance; resistance; incorporation / co-optation; embeddedness; texts in a (global) context; affect theory; model minority

The take-home midterm will be distributed at the end of class today.

October 13 2015 – Reading Week

October 20 2015
Racialized Tropes and Ambivalent Images

TAKE-HOME MIDTERM DUE TODAY

Hall, S. (1981 / 2015). The Whites of Their Eyes: Racist Ideologies and the Media. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 104-107). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Wang, G. (2010). A Shot at Half-Exposure: Asian Americans in Reality TV Shows. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 536-544). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

key concepts: ideology; race; overt and inferential racism; ambivalent images; the “slave-figure;” the “native;” the “clown;” “too Asian;” model minority vs. “quasi-robots” (a.k.a. “the technical but unfeeling Asian” (537)

 October 27 2015
Twilight’s “Noble Savage”

Burke, B. (2011). The Great American Love Affair: Indians in the Twilight Saga. In G.L. Anatol (Ed.) Bringing Light to Twilight: Perspectives on a Pop Culture Phenomenon (pp. 207-219). New York, NY: Palgrave MacMillan. Click here for pdf: The Great American Love Affair.rotated

Read “Sucking the Quileute Dry” online: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/08/opinion/08riley.html

In-class screening: Reel Injun: On the Trail of the Hollywood Indian. PN1995.9.I48 R44 2010

key concepts: exoticized Other; “the white man’s Indian;” the Romantic / Noble savage; “imperialist nostalgia;” representing male violence; racializing violence

November 3 2015
Racializing Sexualities

Rose, T. (2008 / 2015). There Are Bitches and Hoes. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 386-390). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Han, C. (2008 / 2015). “Sexy Like a Girl and Horny Like a Boy:” Contemporary Gay “Western” Narratives About Gay Asian Men. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 220-226). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

key concepts: racializing sexualities; subjects and objects; anti-sex agenda; sexual explicitness vs. sexual exploitation; journalistic texts; gay media; assuming a white audience

November 10 2015
Polysemic Images: Encoding and Decoding Queerness

Padva, G. (2008 / 2015). Educating The Simpsons: Teaching Queer Representations in Contemporary Visual Media. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 203-209). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Moore, C. (2008 / 2015). Resisting, Reiterating, and Dancing Through: The Swinging Closet Doors of Ellen DeGeneres’s Televised Personalities. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 210-219). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

key concepts: depicting and challenging social inequalities; polysemy; queer codes; double-coding; closet; “skirting” / strategic evasion; humour and social inequality

November 17 2015
“Queering Queer Eye

 Booth, E. T. (2011 / 2015). Queering Queer Eye: The Stability of Gay Identity Confronts the Liminality of Trans Embodiment. In G. Dines & J.M. Humez (Eds.), Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader (4th ed.) (pp. 409-417). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. *If this article interests you, consider GEND 2056: Reality TV and the Politics of Difference.

key concepts: liminality in terms of sex, gender and sexuality; transmen; reality TV; makeover genre

November 24 2015
Analyzing Race and Gender on SYTYCD Canada

Boyd, J. (2015). “You Bring Great Masculinity and Truth”: Sexuality, whiteness, and the regulation of the male body in motion. Feminist Media Studies, 15(4), 675-690. doi: 10.1080/14680777.2015.1009928. Read online via Nipissing University e-resources. Using the “Journals by Title” link on the homepage is often the most efficient way to find online journal articles.

In-class screening: Tough Guise 2: Violence, Manhood and American Culture,  BF692.5.T682 2013, 78 minutes

key concepts: whiteness; masculinities; male gender norms / normative masculinity / dominant masculinity; gendering dance; heteronormative; Latina stereotypes

December 1 2015
Wrap up – TBA – FINAL RESEARCH ESSAYS DUE TODAY

ASSIGNMENTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Attendance & participation 15%
Attendance will be taken in class each week. Late entries, as well as early exits, are disruptive, and often result in the missing of important information. Participation includes, but is not limited to, contributing one’s own insights or ideas to class. It also entails respectful listening and a commitment to involving others in the learning process. You are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the day’s readings. Verbal participation in class should be relevant and connected to the readings for the week.

As per the Nipissing University attendance policy, students whose absences exceed 20% of the total number of classes will be excluded from writing the exam: “Punctual and regular attendance is essential for the successful completion of a course. When absenteeism exceeds 20%, the student may be excluded from writing the final examination. If an instructor would like to exclude a student from writing a final examination, the Dean and the student must be notified in writing at least two weeks prior to the exam. Students who wish to appeal this decision may appeal to the Dean” (Accessed on December 31, 2014 at http://www.nipissingu.ca/calendar/regulations/academic/Pages/Attendance.aspx).

Take-home midterm 25% Due October 20 2015
The take-home midterm will be distributed in class on February 10 2015. It will be a combination of short answer and essay based on the readings prior to Reading Week.

Research essay 30% Due January 12, 2016 at 12:30 pm
For information on submitting the essay early, see notes on “Changes to Syllabus” at the top of this syllabus.
Students are asked to choose a media text and create an original critical textual analysis that draws extensively on the course readings (minimum of three) and incorporates one academic journal article (not from the course readings). In addition to the required textual analysis, you may research the series’ audience, ratings, history, production, marketing and scheduling if this interests you. The essay should be a minimum of 6 pages and a maximum of 7 pages. This minimum and maximum do not include the bibliography or a title page (optional). Please use a recognized style: APA, MLA, Turabian, Chicago. See “Important notes for written assignments” below.

Take-home 30% Due January 12, 2016 at 12:30 pm
The take-home test will focus on materials covered after Reading Week. It will be a combination of short answer and essay.

Important notes for written assignments

– On the title page please include your name and always keep a copy of your paper in print or computer file.

– All assignments must be double-spaced, in 12 point font (not a fancy font please), with1 inch margins and page numbers.

– Remember to provide a title, preferably one that highlights your thesis or central concerns.

– Avoid lengthy, overly general introduction; state your intentions concisely and engagingly.

– Each paragraph is to be a unit of thought and should develop an idea.

– Provide transition between topics. Your essay should have continuity; it should “hang together.”

– Support or illustrate your assertions; be as specific and precise as possible.

– Quoted materials (see “plagiarism” below) belong in quotation marks and a page number should be supplied. See syllabus for APA references for readings in the course reader. Use a style guide for references and be consistent. Ideas or passages that are paraphrased (written in your own words) also need to be referenced.

– Avoid over-use of quoted materials. Passages that are quoted need to be contextualized and require comments that directly forward your own argument.

– You may use the word “I” in your work for this class, but your claims must be supported by peer-reviewed academic citations.

– Proofread to avoid errors of spelling, grammar and punctuation.

 Academic Integrity
Plagiarism and academic dishonesty are serious offences. It is your responsibility to be familiar with Nipissing’s policies on academic dishonesty: http://www.nipissingu.ca/calendar/studentpolicies_academicdishonesty.asp

Any instances of students plagiarizing or cheating will be dealt with according to this policy.

Statement of what grades mean

80-100% indicates EXCEPTIONAL PERFORMANCE: comprehensive in-depth knowledge of the principles and materials treated in the course, fluency in communicating that knowledge and independence in applying material and principles.

70-79% indicates GOOD PERFORMANCE: thorough understanding of the breadth of materials and principles treated in the course and ability to apply and communicate that understanding effectively.

60-69% indicates SATISFACTORY PERFORMANCE: basic understanding of the breadth of principles and material treated in the course and an ability to apply and communicate that understanding competently.

50-59% indicates MINIMALLY COMPETENT PERFORMANCE: adequate understanding of most principles and materials treated in the course, but with significant weakness in some areas and in the ability to apply and communicate that understanding.

0- 49% indicates FAILURE: inadequate or fragmentary knowledge of the principles and materials treated in the course or a failure to complete the work required in the course”

Faculty handbook, “Final Grades:” http://www.nipissingu.ca/academics/faculties/arts-science/Pages/Faculty-Handbook.aspx#assessmentofgrades