Courses

PSYC1106 – Introduction to Psychology I
This course is a survey of various perspectives and fields of psychology with reference to the historical development of the discipline. The course stresses scientifically-based biological and environmental explanations of human and animal behaviour. The course topics include the scientific method, brain structure and function, genetic and physiological influences, the senses, and sleep, dreaming, and consciousness, and the major psychological theories – psychoanalytic, behaviouristic, humanistic, cognitive, biological, and evolutionary. The laboratory portion gives students “hands-on” experience to develop a concrete understanding of the role of the scientific method in psychology. Each lab unit focuses on one fundamental area of research design or elementary statistical analysis.

Most Recent Syllabus: Intro to Psychology I – PSYC 1106

 

PSYC1107 – Introduction to Psychology II
This course builds on Introduction to Psychology I and continues the survey of various perspectives and fields of psychology. Further attention is focussed on topics such as research knowledge on developmental, social, personality, and motivational psychology, as well as an introduction to how this knowledge can inform applied areas of psychology such as educational psychology, intelligence testing, and psychological disorders and their treatment. The laboratory portion of the course offers small-group instruction and is intended to give the students, through “hands-on” experience, a concrete understanding of the role of the scientific method in psychology. Each lab unit focuses on one fundamental area of research design or elementary statistical analysis.

Most Recent Syllabus: Intro to Psychology II – PSYC 1107

 

PSYC 3007 – Science of Mind Reading (Coming in Fall 2019)
In this course, you will evaluate the psychological factors that support accurate mental state inferences of people’s thoughts, feelings, or general internal tendencies.

Class discussions will focus on the theories and signals (verbal, non-verbal, or physiological) that people use to understand other people’s states, traits, and interpersonal communications.
By the end of the course, you will be able to:
1. identify various theories and methods for mental state attributions, and
2. evaluate the empirical evidence of theory of mind, personality recognition, and lie detection.

Preliminary Syllabus (as a Special Topics): PSYC 3906

 

PSYC 4105 – Senior Empirical Thesis

Prerequisites: PSYC 3356 or CHFS 3035 with a minimum grade of 70%. Restricted to students in the fourth year of the Honours Psychology program. Approval of the discipline is required prior to registration. Students wishing to take this course during the following Spring/Summer or Fall/Winter Session must apply in writing to the discipline no later than February 15.

Students conduct an empirical investigation of a research problem in psychology. In discussion with a faculty advisor, students identify a research topic of interest and submit an Individualized Course Supervision Contract to the Chair of the Department by February 15 prior to the academic year when the course will be taken. During the course, students engage in novel, psychological research investigations demonstrating competence in research design, analyses, and scientific oral and written communication skills. The final report is written in a style suitable for journal submission.

Most Recent Syllabus – PSYC 4105